Home Hair Loss Forums Natural Treatments Acupuncture and Hair loss: A case Study

Acupuncture and Hair loss: A case Study

This topic contains 11 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of jackk jackk 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
Log In or Register to Post a Reply
by Member19136 » June 7, 2007 at 10:14 am #51361

Alopecia

Alopecia areata is also known as “devil shaving head” in Chinese. The etiology is not clear. Usually it is caused by great mental stress, or great anxiety, or sudden nervous shock. Clinically the hair falls off in patches or complete balding, or even the loss of body hair like eyebrows, beard, arm pit and public hair in severe cases. Traditional Chinese medicine holds that this is due to Yin deficiency of the liver and kidney leading to malnutrition of the hair.

Treatment

Use plum-blossom needle to tap slightly the affected area and making it become congested, red and bleeding for 5-10 minutes. after tapping with plum-blossom acupuncture, rub the skin of balding area with raw and fresh ginger.

Typical case: Female, 40 years of age. “She came to the hospital in July 1985 because of hair loss in patches. She complained that she had the same condition two years ago, and was cured by plum-blossom acupuncture. Recently, she began to have alopecia areata resulting in shiny, smooth bald areas. The sizes of the bald areas varied from 0.5 to 2 cm. in diameter. She was treated again with plum-blossom needle once every two days. After three weeks’ treatment, there was new hair coming out from the bald areas.”

© 1997 Hopkins Technology, LLC

Avatar Image
Member19136
View Profile
by Member19136 » June 7, 2007 at 10:15 am #51362
Avatar Image
Member19136
View Profile
by hatchet » June 7, 2007 at 10:24 am #51363

This sounds very much like the study showing the regeneration of hair follicles in mice during wound healing, i.e. Wnt proteins, etc. Maybe ginger does something to stimulate the Wnt stuff…

Avatar Image
hatchet
View Profile
by Member19136 » June 7, 2007 at 10:46 am #51364

Yes, Hatchet. Thats why I posted it. When i read the article you posted it sounded very familiar to me. I’ve had this information for a couple of years but never try it. Now I think it is worth to try. I will post any results afer a few months.By the way, what is Wnt proteins? can you get through the food? Thanks

Avatar Image
Member19136
View Profile
by hatchet » June 7, 2007 at 10:57 am #51366

I don’t know anything much about Wnt proteins. Far as I can tell they are naturally produced by the body’s cells during wound healing. They can be produced in the lab but not for sale to the public. But there seem to be substances that affect Wnt signalling one way or the other. Every day it seems like I run across something that I think might work in conjunction with the wound healing process, including copper peptides, which supposedly enlarge the hair follicle. I have done a lot of research but haven’t really had time to sort through it all yet. You can buy the plum blossom hammers online and there are rollers with needles that would do the same thing. Then it’s just a matter of figuring out which substance would work best to help acclerate the process, if possible, of regeneration and enlargement of the hair follicles. For now, I’m thinking copper peptides, but maybe ginger would work? Seems to have been tested already, as above. Then there are several other candidates….still thinking….I need to make a list.

Avatar Image
hatchet
View Profile
by deejac » June 7, 2007 at 2:20 pm #51378

Alopecia areata is a totally different animal that MPB and one case study citing one participant is hardly worth mentioning.

my sister has alopecia areata and this past thanksgiving she had a small quarter sized bald patch on the back of her head.i saw her last week and its totally filled in.one could say that turkey cures alopecia based on my sisters responce.

what im trying to say is your accupunture experiment on one person and my sister are exacty the same.only with double blind placebo studies consisting of at least dozens of participants,can we even begin to give any treatment a serious thought.

Avatar Image
deejac
View Profile
by Member19136 » June 7, 2007 at 2:21 pm #51379

Using a Plum Blosson Hammer for Hair Loss Treatment

It’s a given that people will seek alternative cures for any condition. Alternative cures sometimes speed up the healing process already started by traditional clinic or pharmacy-bought medicine. Using a plum blossom hammer for hair loss treatment could be such a cure.

A “plum blossom hammer” for hair loss treatment actually has little to do with the plum flower or the herb per se – it’s a small hammer with five to seven small pins, easy to use and to carry. And it’s not really used to hammer in anything, so try not to think of those toolbox hammers that you use to fix up your garage! The most common use of the plum blossom hammer is to stimulate the skin, not just on the scalp but anywhere else in the body. You don’t forcefully apply it to the skin, but instead just let it bounce naturally off your skin. The rhythmic sensation is therapeutic and painless.

The plum blossom hammer is an acupuncture tool. Acupuncture has been practiced by the Chinese for health and wellness for thousands of years. It is still practiced in the modern world, and now has a more global appeal. But for safest and best results, one should only ever seek the services of a credible and certified practitioner.

Using a plum blossom hammer isn’t the only means of applying acupuncture to the scalp, but it’s something you can do at home. Acupuncturists claim that daily use of the plum blossom hammer can bring about hair growth and improve the circulation of blood in the scalp. Sometimes this is used in tandem with a stimulating ointment.

But before you use a plum blossom hammer for hair loss treatment, make sure that you have the approval of your doctor or hair loss specialist. In fact, you should do this before engaging in any form of herbal or alternative treatment. You may have used medications or undergone surgical procedures that would conflict with the forms of therapy you want to try. You should also bear in mind that alternative cures may not work for everyone; the efficiency of acupuncture or herbal medication will still depend on the unique conditions of your body. Consulting an expert is always the safest thing to do!

Avatar Image
Member19136
View Profile
by Member19136 » June 7, 2007 at 2:27 pm #51380

I found the article above while looking for the Plum Blosson Hammer. Thanks, Hatchet.

deejac, yes they are two different types of hair loss but remember this information is related to articles concerning hair regrowth on people with genetic alopecia. Maybe it does help in both cases What do you think?

Avatar Image
Member19136
View Profile
by t5aylor » June 7, 2007 at 2:55 pm #51385

spontaneous remission from alopecia areata is common , rendering this information worthless. that’s why it is also very diffiult to study this disease and develop treatments for it. It has very little in common with AGA.

T5

Avatar Image
t5aylor
View Profile
by hatchet » June 8, 2007 at 1:53 pm #51468

The reason I find this interesting is because of the similarity to the mouse/wound healing/Wnt protein/follicle regeneration study. The more I read about the very much studied wound healing response in skin the more interesting it becomes and the more certain things seem to tie together.

Avatar Image
hatchet
View Profile
by BobTheBuilder » June 10, 2007 at 11:59 pm #51626

I did a 3 month treatment (plum hammer)

I believe it did not help me at all.

Avatar Image
BobTheBuilder
View Profile
by jackk » March 14, 2017 at 6:08 am #194479

hi
hi
Treating a hair loss with acupuncture technique is a long-term process, which requires a lot of patience and dedication. No miracles should be expected overnight.

It is common for people to lose hair on a daily basis, with some strands falling off each day. It’s also normal for your hair to grow thin over time, especially during the natural process of aging. What makes hair loss a condition for some people is when you are losing hair in clumps rather than strands.

Thanks

[url=http://www.healthline.com/health/depression/expressive-therapy#Overview1] Expressive Therapy For Depression [/url]

Avatar Image
jackk
View Profile
Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.