Home Hair Loss Forums Natural Treatments Green tea increases serumDHT by194%. Immortal help me understand this…

Green tea increases serumDHT by194%. Immortal help me understand this…

This topic contains 13 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of ImmortalHair904 ImmortalHair904 7 years, 3 months ago.

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by Hounty » December 28, 2006 at 11:57 am #42877

Mice treated with black tea tended to have a greater serum testosterone concentration (34.4%, P = 0.50) and had a 72% lower DHT concentration than controls (P < 0.05), suggesting that black tea may contain components that inhibit the activity of 5-reductase, an enzyme that converts testosterone to the more bioactive DHT. Green tea tended to increase serum testosterone and DHT levels by 73.8% (P = 0.14) and 194% (P = 0.076), respectively. The combination of SPC and green tea reduced serum levels of DHT (P < 0.05).

Here is the whole study .

I am all confused now.I thought green tea is good for hair.Of course we are not mices but still…
Immortal,tell me what you think about this.

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Hounty

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by at a loss » December 28, 2006 at 12:50 pm #42878

I found this…

“A concern that is commonly brought up about green tea is the idea that it decreases levels of androgens such as testosterone and DHT. One study reported that after administered to rats, EGCG “significantly reduced food intake; body weight; blood levels of testosterone, estradiol, leptin, insulin, insulin-like growth factor I, LH, glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride” [22]. However, a different study with green tea catechins in rats found decreased body weight but increased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), LH, and testosterone levels [85]. A final study in mice with green tea indicated drastic increases in both testosterone and DHT from green tea treatment, but levels of both were synergistically inhibited when it was adminstered along with soy phytochemicals [86]. In vitro, EGCG inhibits type I 5AR [2, 87], which is partially responsible for the conversion of testosterone to DHT (for this reason, it has been proposed in the topical treatment of acne and hair loss [2]), while in rats, green tea is an aromatase inhibitor, which (in theory) would be responsible for an increase in tesotsterone levels [85].

So, how does one make sense of this mess of contadictory data? It should first be noted that 5AR inhibition has only been shown in vitro [87], while it has not been observed in live animals – in fact, drastic increases in DHT have been found – and it seems that other constituents of green tea counteract the 5AR inhibition [88]. The conclusions of the first study, which found drastic decreases in body weight, testosterone, and other hormones, are very misleading. A drastic reduction in levels of all of the substances mentioned can unfortunately be expected from weight loss in any situation (which is one of the reasons losing weight without losing muscle mass is so difficult). Indeed, when the authors of the same study restricted the food intake of the rats to cause a similar weight loss to that induced by EGCG, similar effects were seen, implying that the changes were not due to EGCG but due to drastic body weight loss [22]. The effect green tea has on levels of androgens and other hormones is complex and depends on various factors, but no detrimental effects have as of yet been seen in human populations. “

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at a loss

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by Jacob » December 28, 2006 at 1:07 pm #42879

See Lipoxidil’s take on gte..especially used TOPICALLY:

This site mentions drinking green tea..and I see it’s probably a source for some other things being discussed and taken around here

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Jacob

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by The_Dice_Man » December 29, 2006 at 12:47 am #42897

Ya know, it makes sense actually. Green tea inhibits type 1 5-alpha reductase…….not type 2. So, that means “more” test can convert to DHT via 5 alpha reductase type 2, bringing on a higher DHT serum level. But I dont think that one should drop green tea extract from the regimen. It has the ability to increase SGBH, which is good. It also has the ability to inhibit MMP 9, which MMP 9 wrecks havok on the hair follicle. Many other good benefits to hair…..and health. But adding soy sure sounds good according to the study huh. I am gonna see if I can find out more about black tea.

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by Hounty » December 29, 2006 at 3:43 pm #42926

The_Dice_Man said:
But adding soy sure sounds good according to the study huh. I am gonna see if I can find out more about black tea.

Dice Man can you recommand some good soy supplements,i will take green tea together with soy from now on.You know ,just to be sure.

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Hounty

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by The_Dice_Man » December 29, 2006 at 4:17 pm #42928

Hounty – HHHHHhmmmmmmm……..well, recommended soy products????………well, to tell you the honest to god truth, I really have no clue man. I really think that might be a question for IH, even though he may not have soy based products in his regimen, he still might be able to help you or us for that matter. Until then, do a search on soy and all that and see about learining about the soy and what products might be of interest. I would start a thread about soy regarding this, (to IH that is)if I were you. I’ll see if I can find something as well. Peace out.

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The_Dice_Man

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by Jacob » December 29, 2006 at 4:23 pm #42929

Go to Mercola.com and search for “soy”. Ha.

Fermented soy seems to be the way to go if you’re into soy.

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by crzyakta » December 29, 2006 at 4:32 pm #42930

too much SHGB is bad in the long run…men usually have too much of it along with estrogen in their later years…leading to less muscle mass, and overweight bodies

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crzyakta

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by The_Dice_Man » December 29, 2006 at 6:26 pm #42934

yes………too much SHGB that is. Balance is the optimum motive. Controlling blood sugar levels is the very first start.

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by shyguy » December 29, 2006 at 9:25 pm #42940

In late AUG 06 I had blood work and my serum DHT was 61 ref>25-80….. SHGB was 25…

From Aug 06 I continued to take only vitamins such as magnesium, b complex, vit c and e, multi-vit, etc… but I did however add Green Tea Extract at 6-10 gms a day….

In Nov 06 I had blood work tested again and my serum DHT level was 47 and my SHGB was now 34…. a 14 point decrease and 9 point increase in just about 2 1/2 months….

Like I stated all I took was GTE w/ other vitamins during that time between blood tests….

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by ImmortalHair904 » December 29, 2006 at 10:14 pm #146637

Hounty – Not all that long ago (a few months), this exact question was raised.

Not luck on my part to bring up that older thread. Anyway…check out the study below:

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1995 Sep 25;214(3):833-8. Related Articles, Links
Click here to read
Selective inhibition of steroid 5 alpha-reductase isozymes by tea epicatechin-3-gallate and epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

Liao S, Hiipakka RA.

Ben May Institute, University of Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

Inhibitors of 5 alpha-reductase may be effective in the treatment of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone-dependent abnormalities, such as benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer and certain skin diseases. The green tea catechins, (-)epigallocatechin-3-gallate and (-)epicatechin-3-gallate, but not (-)epicatechin and (-)epigallocatechin, are potent inhibitors of type 1 but not type 2 5 alpha-reductase. (-)Epigallocatechin-3-gallate also inhibits accessory sex gland growth in the rat. These results suggest that certain tea gallates can regulate androgen action in target organs.

What was gleaned out of the previous thread that was some components of Green Tea increase 5-alpha reductase type I.

However, the primary Gallate EGCG inhibits 5-alpha reductase.

The main kicker is the most recent study, which shows human hair growth both in vitro and in vivo.

Human hair growth enhancement in vitro by green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG).

* Kwon OS,
* Han JH,
* Yoo HG,
* Chung JH,
* Cho KH,
* Eun HC,
* Kim KH.

Department of Dermatology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Laboratory of Cutaneous Aging and Hair Research, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Institute of Dermatological Science, Seoul National University, 110-744 Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Green tea is a popular worldwide beverage, and its potential beneficial effects such as anti-cancer and anti-oxidant properties are believed to be mediated by epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of polyphenols. Recently, it was reported that EGCG might be useful in the prevention or treatment of androgenetic alopecia by selectively inhibiting 5alpha-reductase activity. However, no report has been issued to date on the effect of EGCG on human hair growth. This study was undertaken to measure the effect of EGCG on hair growth in vitro and to investigate its effect on human dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in vivo and in vitro. EGCG promoted hair growth in hair follicles ex vivo culture and the proliferation of cultured DPCs. The growth stimulation of DPCs by EGCG in vitro may be mediated through the upregulations of phosphorylated Erk and Akt and by an increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Similar results were also obtained in in vivo dermal papillae of human scalps. Thus, we suggest that EGCG stimulates human hair growth through these dual proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects on DPCs.

Add on the fact that green tea inhibits MMP-2, -9 the very factors responsible via signaling from DHT to induce hair loss. Further, EGCG has been demonstrated per the study above to increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax ratio
in dermal papilla cells–sounds like a winner to me.

Additional advantages are it’s ability to reduce oxidative stress, which is crucial to desensitize DHT to follicles,
it’s modulating effects on IGF-1 and its normalization effects on SHBG.

Not enough SHBG is bad and too much is bad; EGCG helps normalize this.

If that wasn’t enough, green tea demonstrates improvements in skin, anti-carninogenic, benefits to cardiovascular system and liver function. Improvements in blood sugar metabolism and helps to lower triglycerides (also important in hair loss prevention).

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ImmortalHair904

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by The_Dice_Man » December 29, 2006 at 11:32 pm #42942

shyguy – You stated in your above post that you take 6-10 grams of green tea extract daily!!?!? Are you serious? That much? Surely that was a typo.

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The_Dice_Man

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by The_Dice_Man » December 29, 2006 at 11:41 pm #42943

Another thing too that I was thinking about. Ya know in the study, the rats are consuming the tea………not the whole plant. Perhaps the tea, might very well have things that increase 5 alpha reductase…….while what inhibits the 5 alpha reductase is actually in the plant that isnt drawn out during the brewing process or perhaps destroyed during the brewing. Perhaps there might very well have been a different outcome if the rats were actually “fed” the green tea leaves instead. That would be very interesting to know.

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The_Dice_Man

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by Fat-Elvis » December 30, 2006 at 10:59 am #42954

So basically, a bunch of in vitro and lab rat tests show green tea raises DHT, and a bunch of other in vitro and lab rat tests show green tea inhibits DHT. Thanks, thread!

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