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Subcutaneous Fat (good fat under the skin, stores energy)

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by Anonymous » July 21, 2009 at 1:02 am #128268

Im looking for a way to increase subcutaneous fat in the scalp if anyone knows of anything?? Not alot as it can cause stretching etc but i small amount is what im after as mpb seems to kills that healthy fat in my mind. Any help would be good.

A few intresting facts about subcutaneous fat.

- It stores energy.

- Different to normal fat, subcutanous fat is the fat under the skin (can cause cellulite).

Subcutaneous fat is the fatty or adipose tissue lying directly under the skin layers. Subcutaneous translates to “under the skin.” It contains not only fatty tissues but also blood vessels, which supply the skin with oxygen, and nerves. Subcutaneous fat is a shock absorber, helping to cushion our skin against trauma, and also stores energy, which the body uses during periods of high activity.

Subcutaneous fat differs from fat that lies deeper in the body and cushions our organs. This is called visceral fat. Subcutaneous fat, on the other hand is the fat we most see lying under the skin. Too much fat can cause the skin to become tight or stretched, and result in dreaded cellulite or a dimpled look of the skin. When subcutaneous fat is relatively small in amount, it tends to lie loosely under the skin layers and is thus less visible.

Not all subcutaneous fat is bad, or contributes to what some people consider unsightly. In fact, many people have fat injections to plump out their face and reduce the look of wrinkles. So as much as some of us may battle subcutaneous fat that contributes to notable cellulite, many others seek subcutaneous fat injections to maintain younger looking faces, or hands.

To reduce subcutaneous fat, many people resort to dieting. However, since this fat stores energy, it is often more easily reduced with exercise. Studies focusing on fat measurements show that women who exercise three to four times a week tended to have greater subcutaneous fat weight loss. About 60% of the pounds lost from exercise were subcutaneous fat. Dieters who did not exercise regularly still lost weight, but only about 30% of their weight loss was subcutaneous fat tissue.

Still, even people who are in shape and thin may have a little cellulite. This unfortunately can’t be reduced by most liposuction techniques. However, mini-liposuction is proving helpful in reducing this top layer of fatty tissue.

While we are used to considering fat bad, especially in a diet-obsessed culture, it should be noted that subcutaneous fat does have its purposes. It is fantastic for storing energy, for cushioning nerves and blood vessels, and for protecting the skin and the skeleton. It does serve several important purposes, though one can have too much of a good thing.

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by Anonymous » July 21, 2009 at 1:05 am #128269

intresting is that females (no matter how skinny) allways have cellulite yet males barely ever get it (depending on weight).

My point is that maybe dht is attacking the subcutanous fat.

This could explain why most women never have hairloss and alot of guys do.

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by Anonymous » July 21, 2009 at 1:09 am #128270

I guess what i want to do is increase cellulite under thr scalp.

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by pimpin_hair » July 21, 2009 at 1:14 am #128273

Yo nigga,
Interestin’ shit. Coincidentally, I was looking at the same shiet too. Check this out:

“Increase scalp skin lipids with treatment of pyrithione”

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by Anonymous » July 21, 2009 at 1:24 am #128275

Man i am glad to get a reply. This shit is looking really really promising and i only just started seaching. There is not really anything on the net that seems to speak about the relation between the 2. Yet everything you read makes sense to anything you;ve ever heard about hairloss.

Great link too man. So they used zinc pyrithione, but would that increase subcutanous fat? It seems they were just treating dandruff with it.

Id like to find how cellulite comes about?! Ive done a bit of search but it seems to be just as clueless a subject as hairloss

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by pimpin_hair » July 21, 2009 at 1:46 am #128276

Well, I think skin lipid is synonymous to skin fat so according to that study, yes, ZP will increase subcutaneous fat.

An interesting observation that I would like to share is the one between scalp “pinch-ability” and scalp tightness. When I pinched my sisters’ scalp (she’s only 5)i could literally fold it up. Whereas, when I do that do my NW 3 father,I couldn’t get shit. His scalp was just too tight to do anything. Maybe it has to do with the subcutaneous fat layer ? Androgens cause a decrease in scalp lipid hence, MPB folks’ scalps are less pliable than normal scalp ?

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by Anonymous » July 21, 2009 at 1:55 am #128279

Im thinking the flexibility of the mpb skin vs the overall subcutaneous fat you can grab should be viewed as different things. Ive been doing occluding scalp exercises for a while now and alltho the skin on my mpb areas has become as loose as the non mpb area, The actual fat/meatiness of my mpb area is NOWHERE near as much as the non mpb.

That article you had was intresting but ive allready read alot about zinc for hairloss. Is this certain zinc different to normal zinc? Or maybe the shampoo is only used for the top layers of skin and to increase the fat alot more you would need deeper penetration.

Do you know anymore about zinc for the fat growth? Or do you know of anything else that would work the same?

Thanks heaps for jumpin onboard the thread. I hope we get more people talking about this.

Also i done another thread about cellulite which is basically subcutanous fat. No one knows the actual causes of cellulite but all the opinions are very similar to everything hairloss related. Only it explains how almost all women will get it but not as much for men. I think there is a big cowincedence here.

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by Joanne » July 21, 2009 at 8:52 am #128308

Dr Loren Pickart claims that copper peptides help restore and build the subcutaneous fat layer under the skin, which helps to remodel and heal skin. He has a lot of studies on his skinbio.com site.

I’ve started using his Hair Solutions copper peptide because it feels like the skin on my scalp is getting thinner. I can really feel the bones in my skull when I shampoo or apply topicals. I never felt them so clearly before. Hoping the CPs will help thicken the scalp skin, make it healthier, etc…

Cellulite is a little like fibrosis … cross linked fibers in the epidermis. The underlying fat is no different than any other fat, but it’s just beneath the epidermis and ends up getting pushed up between the fibers creating the orange peel effect. Since men don’t genetically store fat in their ass, hips and thighs (nature’s baby bumper ;-) , it’s not a problem for them. And guys with a big gut usually have deep (visceral) abdominal fat, too far from the skin’s surface to experience the same effect.

I bet if guys got cellulite on their stomachs, (that’s a pretty picture, eh?) we’d have a cure for it by now…lol.

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by The Funky Stumpfighter » July 21, 2009 at 11:08 am #128321

i think that if there were something that effective in building subcutaneous fat levels, then people with lipoatrophy (people who get a ton of insulin injections, people who are on HIV medication) would be all over it. if anything, id go that route and talk to a doctor that deals with lipoatrophy, see what he/she says might work. i looked into it once, because i had lost some weight and my face thinned out. i was given one simple answer: “gain weight”.

i can see the birth of the “gain weight, save hair” movement now. sign me up, ill grab some bacon.

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by Anonymous » July 21, 2009 at 4:44 pm #128340

Hey Joanne. I actually read his interview last night and wether his right or wrong with the copper peptides, i still think he is on track.

What are you using that has Copper Peptides in it?

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by med student 21 » July 21, 2009 at 5:19 pm #128346

Not possible. and it would have little effect to mpb

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by Anonymous » July 21, 2009 at 7:09 pm #128358

med student, can you explain why you think its not possible?

You know that the subcutaneous layer of fat decreases with mpb..

The subcutaneous layer is the very base of all the follicles and capillary etc.

If you have no base, you have no growth.

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by hapyman » July 21, 2009 at 8:53 pm #128378

[0018] The thickness of the dermis, hypodermis and galea capitis of the scalp skin varied with gender and age of subject. The thickness of the epidermis, dermis and hypodermis in a balding subject was significantly decreased by comparison with those in a normal subject. (Hori H, Moretti G, Rebora A, Crovato F. The thickness of human scalp: normal and bald. J Invest Dermatol. 1972 June; 58(6):396-9).

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by hapyman » July 21, 2009 at 8:58 pm #128381

Abstract:
Methods and compositions for (a) stimulating the growth of hair in warm-blooded animals, (b) increasing subcutaneous fat in warm-blooded animals, and (c) increasing the density of hair follicles in warm-blooded animals are disclosed. The methods utilize an effective amount of a composition comprising a derivative of GHL-Cu.

The enhancement of subcutaneous fat in areas associated with increased hair growth is highly significant. Male pattern baldness is intimately associated with a dramatic reduction in the amount of subcutaneous fat associated with hair follicles that are nonproductive. Conversely, during periods of rapid hair growth in mammals, the subcutaneous fat content increase two- to threefold.

…. (found later in the patent) ….

The enhancement of subcutaneous fat in areas associated with increased hair growth is highly significant. Male pattern baldness is intimately associated with a dramatic reduction in the amount of subcutaneous fat associated with hair follicles that are nonproductive. Conversely, during periods of rapid hair growth in mammals, the subcutaneous fat content increase two- to threefold.

The derivatives of the present invention have clinical use in at least two primary areas: (1) the direct stimulation of hair growth in persons with hair loss, (2) the stimulation of hair transplants, and (3) increasing the subcutaneous fat content.

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by hapyman » July 21, 2009 at 9:05 pm #128383
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